Week of 9/26 + NASA STEM Programs for High School students

Monday:

Alum synthesis lab

Tuesday:

Test 1B on formulas

HW: Review stoichiometry (see videos under unit 2 or read sections 3.6 & 3.7 in textbook)

Wednesday

Filter crystals and Micromole rockets lab for juniors/sophomores b/c seniors on trip.

HW: Review stoichiometry (see videos under unit 2 or read sections 3.6 & 3.7 in textbook)

Thursday:

Stoich review and Percent Yield lecture.  Last half of class you measured your crystals and calculated percent yield for lab.   Today’s notes.

HW: See google classroom for lab instructions. See unit outline and first pages of packet for textbook problems on stoichiometry and PY.

Friday

Today we started with practice % yield problems in the packet.  Then we drew pics on big paper of the Micromole rockets lab trials. I had you point out which ratio made the most H2O which was the trial that had the largest popping sound because it produced the most H2O.  Then we labeled the excess and limiting reactants in the other trials to get some practice understanding limiting and excess reactants. Next we tried the limiting reactants problems on the next page of the packet (after percent yield problems, mistakenly labeled pg 17).  Most of you struggled quite a bit with this once we got past molecules and into moles that weren’t even numbers so I showed you the mathematical way to do this.  There is a video under unit 2.  Here’s the notes from today.

The 2nd half of class we started with the Determine Composition of a Mixture Lab.  I handed out different example lab reports to each group. You used these to understand the method, especially the math.

HW: You should do the pre-lab (see packet just before the micromole rockets lab at the back) and set up your lab notebook. You should also practice Percent Yield and Limiting Reactant problems.

Interested in a NASA program?

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium would like to share the following information about the following FREE NASA-related programs for Virginia’s high school students interested in STEM.

Virginia Aerospace Science and Technology Scholars (VASTS) is a NASA-based program for 11th grade students and STEM teachers who are interested in aerospace-related science, technology, engineering and/or math (STEM). This course focuses on space mission design and human space flight. Master Teacher positions are also available.

Virginia Earth Systems Science Scholars (VESSS) is a NASA-based program for 11th/12th grade students and STEM teachers who are interested in Earth Systems Science-related science, technology, engineering and/or math (STEM). This course focuses on Earth Systems Science and the NASA mission that help study these topics. Master Teacher positions are available.

Virginia Space Coast Scholars (VSCS) is a NASA-based STEM program for 10th grade students who are interested in NASA’s space, Earth, and airborne science-related missions managed by NASA Wallops Flight Facility. Master Teacher positions are available.

For high school juniors, Virginia Aerospace Science and Technology Scholars (VASTS) is an interactive online learning course with a space mission design and human space flight theme, culminating in a one-week residential Summer Academy at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton for those students who qualify. Offered at no cost to the student, VASTS consists of eight modules and a final project to be completed from November 2016 through May 2017 under the guidance of licensed master educators. Based on success in the online coursework, students may be selected to attend a Summer Academy where they interact with NASA scientists, engineers and technologists to design a human mission to Mars. Students who successfully participate in VASTS can apply to earn 2 college credits for the online course and 2 additional credits for the Summer Academy.

Please direct students or other faculty to the website for program information and application, http://vasts.spacegrant.org . The deadline for student applications is October 30th, 2016.

For more information on this program, please contact:

Ian Cawthray

VASTS Education Program Coordinator

ian.m.cawthray@nasa.gov

Or visit: http://vasts.spacegrant.org

For High School juniors and seniors, Virginia Earth System Science Scholars (VESSS) is an interactive, on-line Earth System Science Course featuring NASA scientific research and data. The course will be offered for dual enrollment college credit (statewide through TNCC) for high school juniors and seniors beginning in spring semester 2016.

By combining detailed Earth System Science content with real world data analysis, students will be exposed to a rigorous course that will work across science disciplines to cultivate 21st Century Learning Skills. The program will focus on preparing students for the rigors of college and careers while allowing them to develop strong science-based skills such as critical thinking and inquiry-based problem solving. VESSS will have two components. The first component is an online sixteen-week course running from December through April. The second component is a residential NASA Summer Academy at NASA Langley Research Center for students who perform well in the course. Students who successfully participate in VESSS can apply to earn 3 college credits for the online course and 1 additional credit for the Summer Academy.

Please direct students or other faculty to the website for program information and application, http://vsgc.odu.edu/VESSS/. The deadline for student applications is October 30th, 2016.

For more information on this program, please contact:

Joyce Corriere

VESSS Education Program Coordinator

Joyce.H.Corriere@nasa.gov

Or visit: http://vsgc.odu.edu/VESSS/

For high school sophomores, the Virginia Space Coast Scholars (VSCS) is a program focusing on the earth and airborne science, engineering, and technology integral to current missions at NASA Wallops Flight Facility and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport. This dynamic (and FREE) program, designed by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC), inspires students who possess technical and/or scientific interests and are motivated to learn about the many different opportunities that NASA offers.

The VSCS program features two key elements: 1.) an on-line science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning experience featuring five modules; and 2.) a seven-day residential Summer Academy at NASA Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, VA where selected scholars will learn first-hand from NASA professionals about cutting edge technologies and missions. Program Information:

  • FREE Program for 10th Grade Students
  • Online modules covering NASA aircraft, balloon, and sounding rocket missions launched or managed at Wallops Flight Facility
  • Online course runs from December 2016 through April 2017
  • Highly successful students will be selected for a week long Summer Academy at NASA Wallops Flight Facility (Chincoteague, VA)
  • The deadline for student applications is October 30th, 2016
  • http://vscs.spacegrant.org/ for application and more information

For more information, please contact Kirsten Manning, Education Program Coordinator, at kmanning@odu.edu.

Week of 9/19

Monday:

Today we did the Avogadro lab.  Most were able to get a bunch of trials and do initial calculations.

HW: fill in lab report except for conclusion. We’ll do that in class tomorrow.   Make sure you’ve reviewed the videos on empirical and molecular formulas for class on Wed.

 

Tuesday:

Today we worked on Avogadro lab & conclusion writing. I handed out the pink sheet to give you a sense of the structure of a conclusion.  I also emphasized the need to justify your claims – to not just say that a particular error skewed the data, but to think about whether it increase or decreased the final result and by how much. This requires additional calculation to show the significance of the error. Also consider assumptions that might be false!

 

Wednesday:

Today we reviewed empirical and molecular formulas. Making sure to justify each step using atomic and molecular theory. We spent the last half an hour or so working textbook problems.

HW: work on avogadro lab

Thursday:

No class b/c early release

Friday:

The first half of class we worked on the packet – started with page 12 mole problems.  Emphasized using dimensional analysis as well as percent composition to solve.  Then you did some naming practice and I showed you a mnemonic for memorizing the -ate ions.  The second half of class we reviewed for your test on Tuesday.  I will be expecting you to justify molecular and empirical formulas at the molecular level.  See the notes here and here.   The last half hour I introduced the lab we will do on Monday and then had you work on the challenge problems that are in the packet under the objective chart.

HW: Review for test on Tuesday! Finish Avogadro Lab! Read Lab! Make sure to dress in long pants, sleeved shirt, close-toed shoes on Monday.  You may want old clothes. Sulfuric acid will put holes in them!

Week of 9/12

Monday:

Today we started with a warm-up on the difference between chemical and physical properties.  This helped us review molecular level drawing ideas. Then we did  a bunch of lecture on why we think there are atoms/evidence for atoms. If you missed the lecture (check out these notes from class or these typed notes.) and then answer the google classroom essay.  Most of B block was working on the essay.

Tuesday:

Notes on refinement on the atomic model. Here’s the notes.

HW: Watch mass spec video 1.a.3.2, finish that mass spec page in the packet that we were working on in class. Continue with textbook problems.

Wednesday:

Finish up mass spec & Review for test. Here’s the notes w/ answers for mass spec q’s.

Thursday:

Test

Friday:

Review of dimensional analysis ideas + a couple mole problems as a refresher. Then we did CA 2 to see how the mole was derived. You should be able to give 2 meanings of mass on the periodic table now and explain WHY we use 6.022e23.  The rest of class we worked on the Avogadro pre-lab.  Might need to update pre-lab questions next year b/c they don’t lead kids to a conclusion.

HW: Review Moles Video 1.b.2.2 & Naming Review Video 1.b.1.1